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Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Wildflowers of New England

We went on a walk recently and found some beautiful woodland wildflowers. I always point these out to the kids and name them, because I think it is important to know. My many walks in the woods with my grandfather and his lessons about these plants still remain one of my fondest memories.

Here are some of our favorites that we found.

Jack in the Pulpit. These are endangered species in Maine (and parts are poisonous) so leave them where you find them. If you gently lift the middle folded leaf, there is a little 'Jack in the pulpit' standing!
Purple Trillium. These too are endangered in Maine. My grandfather always called them Stinkin' Benjamins. They have a stinky smell!

 Just because it is cute-Squirrel Hideout

I can't find my picture of a pink lady's slipper anywhere! Darn it! I found these nice pictures here. These are native to Maine, and are not "technically" on the endangered list in Maine, but they are in several states (and maybe should be here, considering the fact that many Mainers have probably never seen one-my two cents worth).

 Along the walking path.

 Not from the same walk, but Maine Wild Blueberry blossoms this time of year. In August, they will be beautiful blue berries full of antioxidants and delicious to eat!

There you have it. Today is a great day to get outside and see what you can find.



3 comments:

  1. I would love to learn more of the names of our local wild plants and flowers. Please send along any book recommendations for identifying them.
    The kids and I have been taking some primitive skills classes for over a year now and we've recently been learning about wild edibles. So far we've harvested and used trout lily, Jerusalem artichokes (sunchokes), two different kinds of fiddleheads, cat-nine tails, violets, dandelions, stinging nettle, jewelweed, and Japanese knotweed. We've eaten some fresh in salads and cooked others. Oh, and we've made different teas with white pine needles, hemlock needles, and wintergreen leaves.
    We are learning a ton and having so much fun collecting food in the forest! Take care! ~Laura

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  2. I love walking in the woods. I used to know plant names but the learning is so long ago now that names escape me. I should probably get a book or something... Thanks for these!

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  3. oh to live in a place with wild blueberries! i'd gladly trade our wild blackberries :)

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